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Here we brief about the latest advancements in technology. We want the blog to be interactive and hope people do come up with their queries.

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Nikhil Pandya

A team researchers used a promising new material to build more functional memristors, bringing us closer to brain-like computing. Both academic and industrial laboratories are working to develop computers that operate more like the human brain. Instead of operating like a conventional, digital system, these new devices could potentially function more like a network of neurons.
Researchers are always searching for improved technologies, but the most efficient computer possible already exists. It can learn and adapt without needing to be programmed or updated. It has nearly limitless memory, is difficult to crash, and works at extremely fast speeds. It's not a Mac or a PC; it's the human brain. And scientists around the world want to mimic its abilities.

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Both academic and industrial laboratories are working to develop computers that operate more like the human brain. Instead of operating like a conventional, digital system, these new devices could potentially function more like a network of neurons.

"Memristors could be used as a memory element in an integrated circuit or computer," Hersam said. "Unlike other memories that exist today in modern electronics, memristors are stable and remember their state even if you lose power."

Current computers use random access memory (RAM), which moves very quickly as a user works but does not retain unsaved data if power is lost. Flash drives, on the other hand, store information when they are not powered but work much slower. Memristors could provide a memory that is the best of both worlds: fast and reliable. But there's a problem: memristors are two-terminal electronic devices, which can only control one voltage channel. Hersam wanted to transform it into a three-terminal device, allowing it to be used in more complex electronic circuits and systems.

 

 

Nikhil Pandya

The ocean depths are a notoriously treacherous environment for human beings. As such, robots and remote control vehicles have been used for decades to map and monitor underwater environments.

The trouble is that robots have to be programmed to do what they do. Even simple tasks, when performed underwater, require a lot of time and attention from engineers, who must write scripts for each particular job. There’s got to be a better way, right? Right.

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A research initiative at MIT is currently addressing this issue with a new programming approach that gives robots more cognitive capabilities, allowing them to — for lack of a better term — figure stuff out on their own. A robot crew is assigned a certain high-level goal, then the bots work it out among themselves to determine the best way to accomplish the task.

In fact, the MIT approach is modeled after time-tested top-down command systems, and specifically inspired by the starship Enterprise from Star Trek. One robot acts as the captain, making high-level decisions, while other bots might serve as navigators, engineers or even doctors — repairing other bots.

The approach is similar to a system Williams developed for NASA in the 1990s, which allows for certain autonomous functions on satellites, probes and other spacecraft. 

 

Now, a question arises how trustworthy will be the technology. And even if it can reduce a lot of manpower , will it be able to cover all the scenarios of the situation ??

I would like to know your views...

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